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Would workers at Rhode Island jobs go to bosses about unfair pay?

April 20th, 2014

If workers at Long Island jobs or other jobs across the nation were concerned they weren’t being paid fairly, would they go to their bosses? A new survey from Monster says that yes, they would.

The majority of respondents are likely to go straight to their boss if they found out they were being paid unfairly. 41% of respondents claim that they would approach their boss about their salary and demand a raise; and an additional 36% said that they would additionally start looking for a new job.

“What would you do if you found out you were being paid unfairly?” and received over 7,800 responses. The international findings include:

  • 36% of respondents answered “Talk to my boss and start looking for a new job”
  • 41% of respondents answered “Talk to my boss and demand a raise”
  • 15% of respondents answered “I wouldn’t talk to my boss but would start looking for a new job”
  • 8% of respondents answered “I would complain to friends and family but wouldn’t do anything else”

Workers in France and the United States are most likely to demand a raise (with 49% and 46% answering so, respectively). Workers in Asia and India are most likely to not take action, with the highest rates of answering (11% and 13%) that they would only complain but not take action. Only 2% of US respondents would start looking for a new job without speaking to their boss, while Germans (26%) and Canadians (27%) are the most likely to start a job search without consulting their boss first.

IT jobs in Rhode Island climb

April 6th, 2014

A recent poll points out that IT jobs in Rhode Island may be growing.

CareerBuilder.com released their US jobs outlook, showing that certain industries are expected to outperform the national average for hiring. The number of manufacturing employers planning to add full-time, permanent headcount increased three percentage points over Q2 2013 and beat the national average for this year’s forecast by seven percentage points.

About 27 percent of employers planned to hire full-time, permanent employees in the first quarter of 2014. The number of employers who actually hired full-time, permanent staff was 29 percent, up from 28 percent in the same period last year.

Eleven percent decreased headcount, down from 12 percent last year. Fifty-nine percent said there was no change in their number of full-time, permanent employees while 2 percent were unsure.

Eight percent of employers expect to downsize staff, down from 9 percent last year. Sixty-one percent anticipate no change while 5 percent are undecided.

The top five industries that are expected to surpass the national average for adding full-time, permanent staff in the second quarter include:

· Information Technology – 34 percent of hiring managers

· Financial Services – 34 percent

· Manufacturing – 33 percent

· Health Care1 – 28 percent

· Professional and Business Services – 28 percent

Thirty-one percent of employers anticipate no change in salary levels in the second quarter compared to the same period last year. Forty-one percent expect there will be an increase of 3 percent or less. Nineteen percent expect their average changes will be between 4 and 10 percent and 2 percent predict an increase of 11 percent or more. Three percent anticipate a decline in salaries and 5 percent are undecided.

Temporary employment is showing a slight improvement over last year’s projections. Thirty-three percent of employers plan to hire temporary or contract workers in the second quarter, up from 32 percent in 2013. Twenty-six percent are planning to transition some contract or temporary staff into permanent employees in the second quarter, up from 24 percent last year.

No mobile strategy to recruit for Rhode Island jobs?

March 28th, 2014

Several companies are reporting that they have no mobile strategy in place to fill Rhode Island jobs, according to a recent survey from Robert Half.

One in four companies (28 percent) surveyed by Robert Half Technology has no mobile technology strategy.

About 70 percent of firms said they have implemented some type of mobile technology strategy, with the majority (56 percent) reporting they use a blend of applications and mobile-friendly web pages.

Healthcare services had the greatest percentage of respondents (36 percent) reporting that their organization has no mobile technology strategy. The business services and retail industries had the highest percentages of respondents (65 percent and 63 percent, respectively) using a blend of apps and mobile-friendly web pages.

“To maintain competitive advantage, sectors such as business services and retail need to connect with customers anytime, anywhere, so it’s logical to see them leading the charge in implementing mobile strategies,” says John Reed, senior executive director of Robert Half Technology. “Compliance issues have made it difficult for the healthcare industry to move as quickly as other sectors, but as consumer demand for mobile health information grows, formal mobile strategies are a necessary next step.”

While most organizations have a mobile technology strategy, many are not emphasizing the use of mobile apps to connect with customers and clients. Fifty-eight percent of CIOs polled said their company has not developed a mobile application for customers and clients and has no plans to offer one in the next 12 months.

Retail jobs in Rhode Island climb

March 20th, 2014

According to labor statistics, retail jobs in Rhode Island have grown slightly.

Retail trade employment changed little in February (-4,000). Among the component industries, a job gain in food and beverage stores (+12,000) was more than offset by declines in electronics and appliance stores (-12,000); sporting goods, hobby, book, and music stores (-9,000); and department stores (-7,000). Over the year, retail trade has added 282,000 jobs.

Overall, employment increased by 175,000 in February, and the unemployment rate was little changed. Employment increased in professional and business services and in wholesale trade but declined in information.

Job growth averaged 189,000 per month over the prior 12 months. In February, job gains occurred in professional and business services and in wholesale trade, while information lost jobs.

Information lost 16,000 jobs in February. Most of the decline occurred in motion picture and sound recording (-14,000); employment in this industry can be volatile from month to month.

Employment in other major industries, including mining and logging, manufacturing, transportation and warehousing, financial activities, and government, changed little over the month.

The average workweek for all employees on payrolls edged down by 0.1 hour to 34.2 hours in February. The manufacturing workweek was unchanged at 40.7 hours, and factory overtime edged down by 0.1 hour to 3.3 hours.

The average workweek for production and nonsupervisory employees on private nonfarm payrolls declined by 0.2 hour to 33.3 hours. For production workers, the manufacturing workweek has declined by 0.6 hour over the past 3 months.

In February, employment in construction changed little (+15,000). Over the past year, construction has added 152,000 jobs. Within the industry, employment in heavy and civil engineering construction rose by 12,000 in February.

Employment in health care changed little in February (+10,000). This marks the third consecutive month of little employment change in this industry. Offices of physicians added 8,000 jobs in February. Employment in hospitals changed little over the month but is down by 10,000 over the past 3 months.

Company makes a move to hire for Rhode Island sales jobs

March 4th, 2014

As spring arrives and big projects are planned, Lowe’s, the giant home retailer, is recruiting and hiring big for Rhode Island sales jobs.

Lowe’s said it will hire about 25,000 new employees, which is less than Home Depot’s 80,000.

Experience in home improvement is a plus.

Seasonal jobs available are focused on customer support and include cashiers, lawn and garden employees, loaders, and stockers.

The number of hours worked per week will vary based on the needs of individual stores, but, on average, seasonal employees could work an estimated 20 or more hours per week.

Lowe’s Companies, Inc. is a FORTUNE® 100 company that serves approximately 15 million customers a week at more than 1,825 home improvement and hardware stores in the United States, Canada and Mexico. Founded in 1946 and based in Mooresville, N.C., Lowe’s is the second-largest home improvement retailer in the world.

The company plans to hire and train new seasonal employees first in areas where the climate has begun to warm, and continue on a market-by-market basis by climate and geography.

Hiring has already begun in Florida, south Texas, Arizona and southern California where warmer, spring-like temperatures are arriving.

“Warmer temperatures stir homeowners to get started on projects they’ve planned during winter and they are often challenged when choosing the right products and solutions for their homes,” said Scott Purvis, vice president, human resources, operations. “As Spring arrives, our stores are stocked with popular new tools, lawn and garden, paint and patio products. We want our stores staffed with knowledgeable employees who provide exceptional service and make shopping and selection easier for our customers.”

Rhode Island unemployment high in 2013

March 1st, 2014

Out of all the states, Rhode Island unemployment was the second highest in 2013, according to labor market statistics.

Nevada again had the highest unemployment rate (9.8 percent) in 2013, followed by Rhode Island (9.5 percent) and Illinois (9.2 percent). North Dakota had the lowest jobless rate among the states for the fifth year in a row (2.9 percent), followed by South Dakota (3.8 percent) and Nebraska (3.9 percent). Overall, 25 states had unemployment rates that were significantly lower than the U.S. rate of 7.4 percent, while 11 states and the District of Columbia had rates significantly above it.

No region had a statistically significant change in its employment-population ratio–the proportion of the civilian noninstitutional population 16 years of age and over who are employed. The Midwest continued to have the highest ratio, 60.5 percent, while the South, at 57.8 percent, had the lowest, followed by the West, at 57.9 percent. The ratios in these three regions were significantly different from the national figure of 58.6 percent.

The East South Central was the only division with a statistically significant change in its employment-population ratio in 2013 (-0.8 percentage point). The East South Central again had the lowest proportion of employed persons, 54.4 percent. The next lowest ratios were in the Pacific (57.4 percent), South Atlantic (57.7 percent), and Middle Atlantic (58.0 percent). Ratios in all four of these divisions were significantly below the national average. The division with the highest employment-population ratio was the West North Central, at 64.8 percent, followed by New England, at 60.9 percent. These two divisions, along with the West South Central, at 59.6 percent, had employment-population ratios measurably above that of the U.S.

West Virginia again had the lowest employment-population ratio among the states, 50.1 percent in 2013. West Virginia has had the lowest employment-population ratio each year since the series began in 1976. Four states in the West North Central division again had the highest ratios: North Dakota (69.4 percent), Nebraska (69.2 percent), South Dakota (67.2 percent), and Minnesota (66.8 percent). Overall, 22 states and the District of Columbia had employment-population ratios that were significantly above the U.S. ratio of 58.6 percent, and 18 states had ratios that were appreciably below it. Three states had the lowest employment-population ratios in their series in 2013: Delaware, 56.7 percent; Nevada, 57.2 percent; and Oregon, 56.7 percent.

Government jobs in Rhode Island increasing?

February 18th, 2014

As nationwide the economy improves, it appears government jobs in Rhode Island might also be climbing.

According to the BLS, n January, federal government employment decreased by 12,000; the U.S. Postal Service accounted for most of this decline (-9,000).

In addition, the average workweek for all employees on private nonfarm payrolls was unchanged at 34.4 hours. The manufacturing workweek declined by 0.2 hour to 40.7 hours, and factory overtime edged down by 0.1 hour to 3.4 hours. The average workweek for production and nonsupervisory employees on private nonfarm payrolls was unchanged at 33.5 hours.

Average hourly earnings for all employees on private nonfarm payrolls rose by 5 cents to $24.21. Over the year, average hourly earnings have risen by 46 cents, or 1.9 percent. In January, average hourly earnings of private-sector production and nonsupervisory employees increased by 6 cents to $20.39.

Employment in retail trade changed little in January (-13,000). Within the industry, sporting goods, hobby, book, and music stores lost 22,000 jobs, offsetting job gains in the prior 3 months. In January, motor vehicle and parts dealers added 7,000 jobs.

In January, federal government employment decreased by 12,000; the U.S. Postal Service accounted for most of this decline (-9,000).

Employment in other major industries, including transportation and warehousing, information, and financial activities, showed little or no change over the month.

Among the major worker groups, the unemployment rates for adult men (6.2 percent), adult women (5.9 percent), teenagers (20.7 percent), whites (5.7 percent), blacks (12.1 percent), and Hispanics (8.4 percent) showed little change in January. The jobless rate for Asians was 4.8 percent (not seasonally adjusted), down by 1.7 percentage points over the year.

Employment increased by 113,000 in January. In 2013, employment growth averaged 194,000 per month. In January, job gains occurred in construction, manufacturing, wholesale trade, and mining.

Construction added 48,000 jobs over the month, more than offsetting a decline of 22,000 in December. In January, job gains occurred in both residential and nonresidential building (+13,000 and +8,000, respectively) and in nonresidential specialty trade contractors (+13,000). Heavy and civil engineering construction also added 10,000 jobs.

Nationwide, manufacturing increased in January (+21,000). Over the month, job gains occurred in machinery (+7,000), wood products (+5,000), and motor vehicles and parts (+5,000). Manufacturing added an average of 7,000 jobs per month in 2013.

Construction added 48,000 jobs over the month, more than offsetting a decline of 22,000 in December. In January, job gains occurred in both residential and nonresidential building (+13,000 and +8,000, respectively) and in nonresidential specialty trade contractors (+13,000). Heavy and civil engineering construction also added 10,000 jobs.

Employees with Rhode Island jobs not taking vacation?

February 6th, 2014

It seems some employees with Rhode Island jobs, among other states, did not take advantage of all their vacation days in 2013.

A new survey from Manpower points this out. According to the survey, nearly 70 percent of North American employees do not plan to use all of their annual vacation time.

The 2013 results of the online poll report 69 percent of respondents will not take all their annual vacation, which is consistent with the 70 percent reported for both 2011 and 2012. This year, only 31 percent indicated they will use all their vacation by year end.

“Every employee at every level should be encouraged to take time to reenergize, recharge and relax to be more satisfied and productive on the job,” said Matt Norquist, General Manager at Right Management. “The importance of vacation cannot be understated in today’s workplace when companies are doing more with less and adding workloads to their teams.”

“Ultimately, vacations contribute to engaged, loyal and satisfied employee teams and build a positive workplace culture that not only reduces turnover, but also creates a stronger brand image in the market,” said Norquist.

According to Norquist, taking vacation time is a vital part of maintaining job satisfaction, and employees who take time off are more inspired and motivated to do their best work.

Expansion of infrastructure could create energy jobs in Rhode Island

January 29th, 2014

Several New England governors are reaching out to ISO-New England (ISO-NE) to take initial steps needed to implement the recent regional agreement to expand energy infrastructure in the Northeast, a move that will create energy jobs in Rhode Island.

The New England States Committee on Electricity (NESCOE) asked ISO-NE – operator of the region’s electric grid – to assist the states as they develop requests for proposals to construct the transmission infrastructure to import between 1200 MW and 3600 MW of electricity from clean energy sources into the grid.

Strategic infrastructure investments will improve the region’s economic competiveness and attract new investment by reducing overall energy costs for residents and businesses, while protecting New England’s shared quality of life and environment.

The initiative is designed to accelerate regional cooperation on expanding energy infrastructure in New England and transform the region’s energy, environment, and economic future.

“Today, the New England states took another important step toward realizing a more affordable, reliable, and clean energy portfolio,” said Governor Chafee. “Increasing access to supplies of clean, affordable electricity, such as hydropower, and reducing overall energy price volatility is critical for Rhode Island and the region to safeguard our shared long-term economic and environmental security. We can realize that future by coordinating our energy infrastructure investments throughout the region, and I look forward to working with ISO-NE to achieve a more economically-competitive and environmentally-friendly New England.”

The governors believe that such strategic infrastructure investments will improve the region’s economic competiveness and attract new investment by reducing overall energy costs for residents and businesses, while protecting New England’s shared quality of life and environment.

Could workers be changing Rhode Island jobs?

January 20th, 2014

One out of five workers may be planning on changing Rhode Island jobs, according to a recent survey from CareerBuilder.

Twenty-one percent of full-time employees plan to change jobs in 2014, the largest amount in the post-recession era and up from 17 percent in 2013, according to the survey.

Fifty-nine percent of workers are satisfied with their jobs, down from 66 percent in 2013; 18 percent are dissatisfied, up from 15 percent last year. Those who are dissatisfied cite concerns over salary (66 percent) and not feeling valued (65 percent) most often as reasons for their dissatisfaction.

Certain factors appear to make workers significantly more likely to change jobs than others:

· Workers who are dissatisfied with their job: 58 percent plan to change jobs in the New Year

· Workers who are dissatisfied with advancement opportunities at current company: 45 percent

· Workers who are dissatisfied with their work/life balance: 39 percent

· Workers who feel underemployed: 39 percent

· Workers who are highly stressed: 39 percent

· Workers who have a poor opinion of their boss’s performance: 37 percent

· Workers who feel they were overlooked for a promotion: 36 percent

· Workers who have been with their company two years or less: 35 percent(compared to 13 percent of workers who’ve been with company for 5 or more years.)

· Worker who didn’t receive a pay increase in 2013: 28 percent

“Offering frequent recognition, merit bonuses, training programs and clearly defined career paths are important ways to show workers what they mean to the company,” said Rosemary Haefner, vice president of human resources for CareerBuilder. “In general, however, when more workers change jobs it’s usually a sign the labor market is warming up. During the recession and in its aftermath fewer people voluntarily left jobs because the chances of finding a new or better one were low compared to a healthier economic cycle.”