Find a job at rijobs.com
Participating Publishers

Archive for the 'Uncategorized' Category

Wages declining for Rhode Island science jobs?

Sunday, April 19th, 2015

Wages are possibly on the decline for Rhode Island science jobs, according to a new survey from Payscale.

The Q1 2015 PayScale Index shows national wages for Q1 barely increased at 0.1 percent and the average 12-month change in U.S. wages across all industries was 1.8 percent. Of note, previous top performing sectors such as the professional, scientific and technical services industry and the oil and gas industry experienced a decline in Q1.

Construction jobs and the real estate industry which saw wages decline in recent years are now showing signs of recovery. Finally, the Index shows wage growth continues to lag, as real wages are down almost 7 percent since 2006, a measure calculated by analyzing nominal wage growth and the average change in price of a fixed basket of goods and services.

Key findings in the Q1 2015 PayScale Index:

  • STEM focused jobs experienced a slow-down:
    • Wages for previously ‘hot-performing’ IT, engineering, science and biotech jobs fell slightly in Q1 and have been relatively flat for several months. For example, science and biotech jobs grew just 1.0 percent annually, experiencing the lowest wage growth of any category. However, these jobs are still near the top for wage growth since 2006 (approximately 10 percent), due to remarkable growth for several years.
  • Industry Highlights:
    • Although the oil and gas industry experienced the highest total wage growth since 2006 at 19 percent, declining oil prices resulted in the lowest annual wage growth of any industry at 0.8 percent. Similarly, the oil city of Houston experienced a wage dip in Q1 as wages fell 0.2 percent from Q4 2014 and rose only 1.2 percent annually (behind the national average of 1.8 percent).
    • Real estate tied with the wholesale trade industry for the largest annual growth for Q1 at 3 percent and wages in real estate grew more than 5 percent since their low point in Q3 2013. Wage growth in the real estate industry mirrors recent increases in the housing market.
    • Similar to real estate, the construction industry also experienced a recovery with annual wage growth of 2.7 percent. A previous wage loser, annual wage growth for construction jobs topped the list for all job categories with 2.9 percent.

Manufacturing jobs in Rhode Island down

Tuesday, April 7th, 2015

Manufacuring jobs in Rhode Island may be decreasing, according to the latest national employment report from ADP.

Overall, private sector employment increased by 189,000 jobs from February to March.

Goods-producing employment rose by only 5,000 jobs in March, down from 22,000 jobs gained in February. The construction industry added 17,000 jobs, down from 28,000 last month. Meanwhile, manufacturing lost 1,000 jobs in March, after adding 2,000 in February.

Service-providing employment rose by 184,000 jobs in March, down from 192,000 in February. The ADP National Employment Report indicates that professional/business services contributed 40,000 jobs in March, up from February’s 34,000. Expansion in trade/transportation/utilities grew by 25,000, a decline from February’s 32,000. The 16,000 new jobs added in financial activities is a drop from last month’s 19,000.

Payrolls for businesses with 49 or fewer employees increased by 108,000 jobs in March, up from 103,000 in February. Employment among companies with 50-499 employees increased by 62,000 jobs, up from 57,000 the previous month.

Employment at large companies - those with 500 or more employees - decreased from February adding 19,000 jobs, down sharply from 53,000. Companies with 500-999 employees added 7,000 jobs, down from February’s 11,000. Companies with over 1,000 employees added 12,000 jobs, down from 43,000 the previous month.

Construction jobs in RI growing?

Monday, March 30th, 2015

The state may have seen some growth of construction jobs in Rhode Island, according to the latest stats from the Bureau of Labor Statistics.

Construction added 29,000 jobs in February. Employment in specialty trade contractors rose by 27,000, mostly in the residential component. Over the past 12 months, construction has added 321,000 jobs.

In February, employment in health care rose by 24,000, with gains in ambulatory care services (+20,000) and hospitals (+9,000). Health care had added an average of 29,000 jobs per month over the prior 12 months.

Transportation and warehousing added 19,000 jobs in February, with most of the gain occurring in couriers and messengers (+12,000). Employment in transportation and warehousing grew by an average of 14,000 per month over the prior 12 months.

Employment in retail trade continued to trend up in February (+32,000) and has grown by 319,000 over the year.

Manufacturing employment continued to trend up in February (+8,000). Within the industry, petroleum and coal products lost 6,000 jobs, largely due to a strike.

Employment in mining decreased by 9,000 in February, with most of the decline in support activities for mining (-7,000).

Employment in other major industries, including wholesale trade, information, financial activities, and government, showed little change over the month.

Employment increased by 295,000 in February, and the unemployment rate edged down to 5.5 percent

How to act like a CEO to get management jobs in Rhode Island

Tuesday, March 24th, 2015

There may be some tricks and tips to getting management jobs in Rhode Island, according to a recent survey from Careerbuilder.

Will dressing and acting like a senior VP get you the job?

“Certainly, getting ahead in your career is based largely on your performance,” says Rosemary Haefner, chief human resources officer of CareerBuilder. “The way you present yourself, however, is to many a reflection of how seriously you take your job.”

Haefner offers the following tips to dress – and behave – for career success.

how seriously you take your job.” Haefner offers the following tips to dress – and behave – for career success.

  1. Follow the leader…The CEO and other senior leaders should set the tone for how to conduct yourself in the workplace, so look toward them for direction when it comes to not just dressing the part, but conducting yourself like a leader as well.
  2. Dress for success. But don’t get caught in a “who wore it better” situation. Showing up in the exact same Brooks Brothers suit the boss wore on Monday could be could be perceived as sucking up – or simply creepy. Remember who you are as an individual. Adding accessories like jewelry, scarves or ties to a classic black pant suit, for example, creates a look that is both professional and reflects your personal style.
  3. Be the brand. Even when they’re not at the office, CEOs and senior executives are considered the “face” of the brand; therefore, even when they’re not at work, they are living by the company’s brand values. Take this into consideration when you’re out socializing–and posting on social media. Remember that you’re a representation of your company’s (and your personal) brand and how you act reflects on that brand.
  4. Ask for what you want. Don’t wait around for your manager to recognize your leadership potential. Take the initiative and ask your manager for more responsibility. Be clear about your career goals and see if you can together to create a clear plan for the future.

Finance jobs in Rhode Island grow slowly

Sunday, March 8th, 2015

New statistics point to finance jobs in Rhode Island growing slowly, according to the Bureau of Labor Statistics.

Job gains occurred in food services and drinking places, professional and business services, construction, health care, and in transportation and warehousing. Employment in mining was down over the month.

Employment increased by 295,000 in February, and the unemployment rate edged down to 5.5 percent.

Both the unemployment rate (5.5 percent) and the number of unemployed persons (8.7 million) edged down in February. Over the year, the unemployment rate and the number of unemployed persons were down by 1.2 percentage points and 1.7 million, respectively.

Transportation and warehousing added 19,000 jobs in February, with most of the gain occurring in couriers and messengers (+12,000). Employment in transportation and warehousing grew by an average of 14,000 per month over the prior 12 months.

Manufacturing employment continued to trend up in February (+8,000). Within the industry, petroleum and coal products lost 6,000 jobs, largely due to a strike.

Employment in mining decreased by 9,000 in February, with most of the decline in support activities for mining (-7,000).

Employment in other major industries, including wholesale trade, information, financial activities, and government, showed little change over the month.

Construction added 29,000 jobs in February. Employment in specialty trade contractors rose by 27,000, mostly in the residential component. Over the past 12 months, construction has added 321,000 jobs.

In February, employment in health care rose by 24,000, with gains in ambulatory care services (+20,000) and hospitals (+9,000). Health care had added an average of 29,000 jobs per month over the prior 12 months.

Seniors delaying retirement from Rhode Island jobs?

Monday, March 2nd, 2015

It may be a fact that seniors are delaying retirement for several reasons from Rhode Island jobs, according to a survey from Careerbuilder.

According to the survey, the number of workers age 60 or older currently delaying retirement reached a post-recession low of 53 percent. This number is down from 58 percent last year and 66 percent in 2010.

75 percent of workers age 60 or older currently delaying retirement cite the recession as a cause. Twelve percent don’t think they will ever be able to retire – up slightly from 11 percent last year – and nearly half (49 percent) feel retirement is at least 5 years out.

A vast majority of senior workers not planning to work post-retirement intend to focus on relaxation (70 percent) and spending time with family and friends (57 percent). Other plans include:

  • Traveling – 48 percent
  • Taking up a hobby/spending more time on a hobby – 44 percent
  • Volunteering – 36 percent
  • Exercise – 36 percent
  • Renovating home – 8 percent
  • Mentoring – 5 percent
  • Going back to school – 3 percent

At 78 percent, the inability to retire due to household financial situations is the clear number one reason senior workers delay retirement. The need for health insurance and benefits follows at 60 percent.

However, many senior workers simply don’t want to stop working. One third of workers (age 60+) delaying retirement aren’t calling it quits because they enjoy their job; 28 percent are delaying retirement because “they enjoy where they work” and 26 percent “fear retirement may be boring.”

Construction jobs in Rhode Island grow

Saturday, February 21st, 2015

Construction jobs in Rhode Island and other areas continue to show strong growth, according to an ADP report.

The ADP Workforce Vitality Index, which measures the total wages paid to the U.S. private sector workforce, was 106.7 in the fourth quarter of 2014.

Workforce vitality varies across industries. The strongest growth over the past year has been in Construction, 8.4%, thanks to a combination of strong employment growth, wage growth and an increase in hours worked.  Manufacturing WVI advanced by 6.3% due to growth in wages and employment in large companies with more than 1,000 workers.

The WVI in Leisure & Hospitality and Trade advanced just over 6%, due to solid gains in both wages and employment.  Financial service workers enjoyed strong wage growth of 5.9%, but experienced weak employment growth.

The weakest index growth has been in Professional/Business Services and the Education/Healthcare sector, mostly due to weak wage growth.

The WVI is growing most quickly for younger workers, those under 25 years of age.  During the past four quarters it grew by 8.6%.  The annual turnover rate for workers under 25 was 49% in 2014 compared to an average of 23% nationwide, indicating more opportunities in the labor market for this age group.

Wages for those in the under-25 group grew more than twice as fast as the wages of any other group.  On the other end of the spectrum, the 55+ segment was second in terms of WVI growth.

The index for these workers increased by 6.5%.  Wages increased by 2.3%, which was slightly lower than the wage growth of the two middle tiers. Workers 55+ showed stronger employment growth than the other age groups.

This may have been driven by a combination of workers crossing the 55 age threshold and older workers delaying retirement.

Short-term compensation program helps people find Rhode Island jobs

Friday, February 6th, 2015

A slew of labor grants are going to help people find Rhode Island jobs.

With $37,814,386 in new U.S. Department of Labor grants, employers in 13 states will soon have a new tool that may help them avoid layoffs by helping states develop a new, or enhance an existing, Short-Time Compensation program.

The states of Arkansas, California, Connecticut, Illinois, Iowa, Massachusetts, Missouri, New Hampshire, New York, Pennsylvania, Rhode Island, Texas and Wisconsin are the recipients of the grants.

STC programs allow employers facing economic difficulty to reduce work hours for a group of employees as an alternative to layoffs.

Programs allow workers with reduced hours to supplement their lowered wages with a percentage of the weekly unemployment compensation that would have been available to them had they been laid off entirely.

Since grants for STC programs enhancements were first authorized by the Middle Class Tax Relief and Job Creation Act of 2012, a total of $50,461,663 have been awarded to 17 states. Michigan, Ohio, Oregon, Texas and Washington State were previously funded.

STC lets employees keep their jobs — and benefits such as employer-based retirement and health insurance — and helps employers keep skilled workers and avoid the costs of hiring and training new workers when business recovers. The program also eases the strain on local economies, which acutely suffer when layoffs occur.

“Employers want to do right by their workers, and offering them resources to be flexible during tough business cycles is not only good for business, it’s good for our economy,” said U.S. Secretary of Labor Thomas E. Perez. “States that incorporate Short-Time Compensation programs are helping their employers be more nimble, keeping more workers on the job and reducing the burden on unemployment insurance programs.”

Tech jobs in Rhode Island lost

Friday, February 6th, 2015

A new survey from global outplacement Challenger, Gray & Christmas, Inc. shows that tech jobs in Rhode Island and other locations have been cut.

Employers in the technology sector announced a total of 100,757 job cuts in 2014.

The biggest increase in job-cut activity occurred in the electronics industry, where annual job cuts surged 120 percent from 8,830 in 2013 to 19,408 last year. The 2014 total was the largest for the electronics industry since 65,300 layoffs were announced by these firms in 2009.

Job cuts in the telecommunications industry also increased in 2014, rising 68 percent to 21,821. The increase comes just one year after annual job cuts in the industry shrank to 12,952, the lowest 12-month total on record.

“Oddly, the technology sector was among the stronger segments of the economy in 2014 and is likely to be a source for continued growth and job creation in 2015. However, we did see several large scale layoff announcements from tech giants, including 18,000 from Microsoft and 16,000 from Hewlett-Packard, which has now shed more than 50,000 workers since 2013,” said John A. Challenger, chief executive officer of Challenger, Gray & Christmas.

“Announcements from other old-guard tech firms, such as Cisco Systems, Intel and Symantec, are not indicative of a sector in decline, but of one that is in flux. Several of the firms announcing job cuts in 2014 mentioned the need to be more nimble and streamlined to remain competitive.

“Technology is sector where trends shift quickly and companies have to be able to pivot in response without enduring several quarters of earnings losses. It is common to see simultaneous job destruction and creation, as employers shed workers in one area, while building up another. So, the heavy downsizing that occurred in this sector last year should not be cause for alarm,” noted Challenger.

Creative director jobs in Rhode Island getting salary increase

Tuesday, January 27th, 2015

People who have creator director jobs in Rhode Island may be getting a salary increase at some point, according to a survey from Robert Half.

The following six potentially high-paying jobs are expected to see the most substantial increases in average starting salary in 2015, according to the Robert Half Salary Guides*:

  1. Mobile applications developer: The need for skilled professionals who can develop applications for tablets and smartphones will only intensify as companies keep pace with the growing mobile market. Similar to 2014, experienced mobile applications developers can expect to see the largest increase (10.2 percent) in starting compensation of any tech position listed in the Salary Guide, earning between $107,500 and $161,500, on average.
  2. Big data engineer: As organizations of all types launch or advance big data initiatives, many will look to hire experienced engineers who can communicate with business users and data scientists, and translate business objectives into data processing workflows. Big data engineers can anticipate a 9.3 percent boost in starting pay in 2015, with average salaries ranging from $119,250 to $168,250.
  3. Wireless network engineer: Professionals who can effectively research, design, implement and optimize wireless networks will be in high demand as more internal infrastructure projects are launched to support the rising use of mobile devices and wireless technologies. Wireless network engineers can expect a 9.1 percent bump in base compensation this year, with average starting salaries between $99,000 and $137,500.
  4. User experience (UX) director: A compelling and satisfying user experience is vital to the success of any web or mobile initiative. Organizations need creative leadership to ensure the user experience across web and mobile properties is consistent and aligns with business strategy and brand identity. Experienced UX directors can anticipate average starting salaries between $110,500 and $178,000, up 6.8 percent from 2014.
  5. Interactive creative director: To execute successful interactive marketing and advertising campaigns, companies need creative leaders who are adept at coordinating the efforts of designers, writers and art directors into one cohesive vision. Skilled interactive creative directors can expect average starting salaries to increase 5.7 percent in 2015, to the range of $100,500 to $180,250.
  6. Web designer (5+ years of experience): Organizations need experienced web designers to ensure their Internet and intranet sites, and digital communications — such as emails, online ads and social media sites — accurately reflect the goals, objectives and identity of the business. Web designers with five or more years of experience can expect to earn between $80,000 and $112,500, on average, a gain of 4.8 percent over last year.