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Employers leaving a bad impression on those seeking Rhode Island jobs?

Monday, May 25th, 2015

The candidate experience may be dampening an employer’s reputation when it comes to those seeking Rhode Island jobs, according to a recent Careerbuilder study.
The 2015 Candidate Behavior study, conducted by Inavero on behalf of CareerBuilder of more than 5,013 workers ages 18 and over and 2,002 hiring decision makers between February 3 and February 18, 2015, sheds light on the differences between what candidates expect from potential employers during the job application process and what employers actually deliver.

The six facts every employer should know about the candidate experience include:

Fact: Candidate Experience Matters (More Than You Know)

According to the study, 82 percent of employers think there’s little to no negative impact on the company when a candidate has a bad experience during the hiring process. The reality, however, is that the majority of candidates do not take poor treatment lying down: 58 percent are less likely to buy from a company to which they’ve applied if they don’t get a response to their application; 69 percent are less likely if they have a bad experience in the interview; and the same is true of 65 percent if they didn’t hear back after an interview.

Conversely, a good candidate experience can have the reverse effect: 69 percent of candidates are more likely to buy from a company to which they’ve applied if they’re treated with respect throughout the application process, and 67 percent are likely to do the same if they receive consistent updates throughout the recruitment process.

Fact: Employers May Be Missing Opportunities to Connect with Candidates

Job seekers may be searching for jobs in a lot of places where employers don’t have a presence. Candidates consult up to 18 resources throughout their job search – including job boards, social networking sites, search engines and online referrals – but the majority of employers (58 percent) don’t use tracking or coding technology to learn where candidates are coming from and ensure they are making efficient use of their recruitment marketing efforts. Without any data on where their candidates are coming from, employers may be missing opportunities to connect with candidates where they are actually searching.

Fact: Candidates Expect More Than You’re Giving Them

For some candidates, the myth of the infamous application “black hole” is all too real. More than half of employers (52 percent) respond to less than half of the candidates who apply. What these employers may not realize, however, is that not only do most candidates expect an automated reply that acknowledges their application, the majority (84 percent) also expect a personal email response, and 52 percent anticipate a phone call. Even when the news isn’t what they hope to receive, candidates expect a response: 1 in 4 candidates (25 percent) expect to hear if the employer will not be bringing them in for an interview.

Fact: Ongoing Communication is Critical for Candidates

When it comes to candidate communication, employers seem to be falling short of candidates’ expectations. Thirty-six percent of candidates expect to be updated throughout the application process, and 41 percent expect to be notified if they weren’t chosen after they interviewed with the company. Yet only 26 percent of employers proactively communicate with candidates what stage of the hiring process they’re in. Even when they’ve made it as far into the process as an interview, many candidates are still left in the dark: Nearly three in four (73 percent) candidates who interviewed with companies said they were never given an explanation for why they didn’t get the job.

Initiative to help job seekers get Rhode Island jobs

Friday, May 8th, 2015

RealJobs RI is a new initiative that will help job seekers get Rhode Island jobs.

The Rhode Island Department of Labor and Training t is soliciting planning grant proposals for Real Jobs RI, part of Governor Gina M. Raimondo’s jobs plan that puts employers’ needs at the center of government workforce development actions to jumpstart the Rhode Island economy.

Real Jobs RI is a flexible grant program to support ideas from employers and partners of all sizes, to connect people to job openings more quickly. It is demand driven, collaborative, and business led.

This solicitation will help employers to analyze their workforce demands and build partner relationships that will produce a stable pipeline of workers to jobs.

Planning grants of up to $25,000 per grant, for a total of $300,000, will be awarded to enable employers to convene partnerships, determine the specific workforce needs of employers, gather the necessary partners and produce a proposed plan to train individuals to meet those needs. Implementation grants will be available to fund those partnerships whose plans are approved and selected.

“We’ve heard from too many Rhode Island business owners who have struggled to find skilled workers to fill the jobs they have now,” said Governor Raimondo. “Real Jobs RI will help spark our economic recovery by connecting employers with the trained workforce they need to grow and expand. These planning grants are a key step in establishing critical industry partnerships that will put Rhode Islanders back to work.”

“The Real Jobs RI planning grant release is a first step in creating a more demand driven workforce system,” said DLT Director Scott Jensen. “This is an exciting opportunity to learn more about the real demand in Rhode Island’s vibrant sectors.”

“It’s essential that we focus on the specific needs of employers as we reshape Rhode Island’s job training system.  That’s what the Real Jobs approach is all about,” said Stefan Pryor, Rhode Island Secretary of Commerce. “Accepting applications is the beginning of what we hope is a successful program—helping employers gain the workforce they need to grow.”

Are people asking illegal questions about Rhode Island jobs?

Tuesday, May 5th, 2015

It may be possible that people are asking illegal questions when it comes to Rhode Island jobs.

In a recent CareerBuilder survey, 20 percent of hiring managers indicated they have asked a question in a job interview only to find out later that it was illegal to ask.

Interview Questions That Aren’t Okay to Ask

The following questions are illegal for hiring managers to ask; yet, when asked if they knew if these questions were illegal, at least one third of employers indicated they didn’t know:

- What is your religious affiliation?

- Are you pregnant?

- What is your political affiliation?

- What is your race, color or ethnicity?

- How old are you?

- Are you disabled?

- Are you married?

- Do you have children or plan to?

- Are you in debt?

- Do you social drink or smoke?

Some interview questions seem inappropriate because they are, as noted above. Others, however, seem inappropriate because they are unfamiliar. But though the following interview questions may have one wondering, “What does this have to do with the job?” there is a method to hiring managers’ perceived madness. Below are some of the most unusual – but still legal – interview questions hiring managers say they have asked job candidates, and what these questions really assess:

“How would you wrangle a herd of cats?” A hiring manager might ask a question like this to gain insight into a candidate’s ability to organize, lead and motivate others.

“Do you believe in life on other planets?” A question like this might be asked to see if a candidate has an attitude that anything is possible.

“What superpower would you like to have?” How candidates answer this question can provide insight into how they view their own strengths and weaknesses.

“If you were stranded on an island, which two items would you like to have with you?” Answers to this question could indicate a candidate’s ability to weather a tough situation with limited resources.

Wages declining for Rhode Island science jobs?

Sunday, April 19th, 2015

Wages are possibly on the decline for Rhode Island science jobs, according to a new survey from Payscale.

The Q1 2015 PayScale Index shows national wages for Q1 barely increased at 0.1 percent and the average 12-month change in U.S. wages across all industries was 1.8 percent. Of note, previous top performing sectors such as the professional, scientific and technical services industry and the oil and gas industry experienced a decline in Q1.

Construction jobs and the real estate industry which saw wages decline in recent years are now showing signs of recovery. Finally, the Index shows wage growth continues to lag, as real wages are down almost 7 percent since 2006, a measure calculated by analyzing nominal wage growth and the average change in price of a fixed basket of goods and services.

Key findings in the Q1 2015 PayScale Index:

  • STEM focused jobs experienced a slow-down:
    • Wages for previously ‘hot-performing’ IT, engineering, science and biotech jobs fell slightly in Q1 and have been relatively flat for several months. For example, science and biotech jobs grew just 1.0 percent annually, experiencing the lowest wage growth of any category. However, these jobs are still near the top for wage growth since 2006 (approximately 10 percent), due to remarkable growth for several years.
  • Industry Highlights:
    • Although the oil and gas industry experienced the highest total wage growth since 2006 at 19 percent, declining oil prices resulted in the lowest annual wage growth of any industry at 0.8 percent. Similarly, the oil city of Houston experienced a wage dip in Q1 as wages fell 0.2 percent from Q4 2014 and rose only 1.2 percent annually (behind the national average of 1.8 percent).
    • Real estate tied with the wholesale trade industry for the largest annual growth for Q1 at 3 percent and wages in real estate grew more than 5 percent since their low point in Q3 2013. Wage growth in the real estate industry mirrors recent increases in the housing market.
    • Similar to real estate, the construction industry also experienced a recovery with annual wage growth of 2.7 percent. A previous wage loser, annual wage growth for construction jobs topped the list for all job categories with 2.9 percent.

Manufacturing jobs in Rhode Island down

Tuesday, April 7th, 2015

Manufacuring jobs in Rhode Island may be decreasing, according to the latest national employment report from ADP.

Overall, private sector employment increased by 189,000 jobs from February to March.

Goods-producing employment rose by only 5,000 jobs in March, down from 22,000 jobs gained in February. The construction industry added 17,000 jobs, down from 28,000 last month. Meanwhile, manufacturing lost 1,000 jobs in March, after adding 2,000 in February.

Service-providing employment rose by 184,000 jobs in March, down from 192,000 in February. The ADP National Employment Report indicates that professional/business services contributed 40,000 jobs in March, up from February’s 34,000. Expansion in trade/transportation/utilities grew by 25,000, a decline from February’s 32,000. The 16,000 new jobs added in financial activities is a drop from last month’s 19,000.

Payrolls for businesses with 49 or fewer employees increased by 108,000 jobs in March, up from 103,000 in February. Employment among companies with 50-499 employees increased by 62,000 jobs, up from 57,000 the previous month.

Employment at large companies - those with 500 or more employees - decreased from February adding 19,000 jobs, down sharply from 53,000. Companies with 500-999 employees added 7,000 jobs, down from February’s 11,000. Companies with over 1,000 employees added 12,000 jobs, down from 43,000 the previous month.

Construction jobs in RI growing?

Monday, March 30th, 2015

The state may have seen some growth of construction jobs in Rhode Island, according to the latest stats from the Bureau of Labor Statistics.

Construction added 29,000 jobs in February. Employment in specialty trade contractors rose by 27,000, mostly in the residential component. Over the past 12 months, construction has added 321,000 jobs.

In February, employment in health care rose by 24,000, with gains in ambulatory care services (+20,000) and hospitals (+9,000). Health care had added an average of 29,000 jobs per month over the prior 12 months.

Transportation and warehousing added 19,000 jobs in February, with most of the gain occurring in couriers and messengers (+12,000). Employment in transportation and warehousing grew by an average of 14,000 per month over the prior 12 months.

Employment in retail trade continued to trend up in February (+32,000) and has grown by 319,000 over the year.

Manufacturing employment continued to trend up in February (+8,000). Within the industry, petroleum and coal products lost 6,000 jobs, largely due to a strike.

Employment in mining decreased by 9,000 in February, with most of the decline in support activities for mining (-7,000).

Employment in other major industries, including wholesale trade, information, financial activities, and government, showed little change over the month.

Employment increased by 295,000 in February, and the unemployment rate edged down to 5.5 percent

How to act like a CEO to get management jobs in Rhode Island

Tuesday, March 24th, 2015

There may be some tricks and tips to getting management jobs in Rhode Island, according to a recent survey from Careerbuilder.

Will dressing and acting like a senior VP get you the job?

“Certainly, getting ahead in your career is based largely on your performance,” says Rosemary Haefner, chief human resources officer of CareerBuilder. “The way you present yourself, however, is to many a reflection of how seriously you take your job.”

Haefner offers the following tips to dress – and behave – for career success.

how seriously you take your job.” Haefner offers the following tips to dress – and behave – for career success.

  1. Follow the leader…The CEO and other senior leaders should set the tone for how to conduct yourself in the workplace, so look toward them for direction when it comes to not just dressing the part, but conducting yourself like a leader as well.
  2. Dress for success. But don’t get caught in a “who wore it better” situation. Showing up in the exact same Brooks Brothers suit the boss wore on Monday could be could be perceived as sucking up – or simply creepy. Remember who you are as an individual. Adding accessories like jewelry, scarves or ties to a classic black pant suit, for example, creates a look that is both professional and reflects your personal style.
  3. Be the brand. Even when they’re not at the office, CEOs and senior executives are considered the “face” of the brand; therefore, even when they’re not at work, they are living by the company’s brand values. Take this into consideration when you’re out socializing–and posting on social media. Remember that you’re a representation of your company’s (and your personal) brand and how you act reflects on that brand.
  4. Ask for what you want. Don’t wait around for your manager to recognize your leadership potential. Take the initiative and ask your manager for more responsibility. Be clear about your career goals and see if you can together to create a clear plan for the future.

Finance jobs in Rhode Island grow slowly

Sunday, March 8th, 2015

New statistics point to finance jobs in Rhode Island growing slowly, according to the Bureau of Labor Statistics.

Job gains occurred in food services and drinking places, professional and business services, construction, health care, and in transportation and warehousing. Employment in mining was down over the month.

Employment increased by 295,000 in February, and the unemployment rate edged down to 5.5 percent.

Both the unemployment rate (5.5 percent) and the number of unemployed persons (8.7 million) edged down in February. Over the year, the unemployment rate and the number of unemployed persons were down by 1.2 percentage points and 1.7 million, respectively.

Transportation and warehousing added 19,000 jobs in February, with most of the gain occurring in couriers and messengers (+12,000). Employment in transportation and warehousing grew by an average of 14,000 per month over the prior 12 months.

Manufacturing employment continued to trend up in February (+8,000). Within the industry, petroleum and coal products lost 6,000 jobs, largely due to a strike.

Employment in mining decreased by 9,000 in February, with most of the decline in support activities for mining (-7,000).

Employment in other major industries, including wholesale trade, information, financial activities, and government, showed little change over the month.

Construction added 29,000 jobs in February. Employment in specialty trade contractors rose by 27,000, mostly in the residential component. Over the past 12 months, construction has added 321,000 jobs.

In February, employment in health care rose by 24,000, with gains in ambulatory care services (+20,000) and hospitals (+9,000). Health care had added an average of 29,000 jobs per month over the prior 12 months.

Seniors delaying retirement from Rhode Island jobs?

Monday, March 2nd, 2015

It may be a fact that seniors are delaying retirement for several reasons from Rhode Island jobs, according to a survey from Careerbuilder.

According to the survey, the number of workers age 60 or older currently delaying retirement reached a post-recession low of 53 percent. This number is down from 58 percent last year and 66 percent in 2010.

75 percent of workers age 60 or older currently delaying retirement cite the recession as a cause. Twelve percent don’t think they will ever be able to retire – up slightly from 11 percent last year – and nearly half (49 percent) feel retirement is at least 5 years out.

A vast majority of senior workers not planning to work post-retirement intend to focus on relaxation (70 percent) and spending time with family and friends (57 percent). Other plans include:

  • Traveling – 48 percent
  • Taking up a hobby/spending more time on a hobby – 44 percent
  • Volunteering – 36 percent
  • Exercise – 36 percent
  • Renovating home – 8 percent
  • Mentoring – 5 percent
  • Going back to school – 3 percent

At 78 percent, the inability to retire due to household financial situations is the clear number one reason senior workers delay retirement. The need for health insurance and benefits follows at 60 percent.

However, many senior workers simply don’t want to stop working. One third of workers (age 60+) delaying retirement aren’t calling it quits because they enjoy their job; 28 percent are delaying retirement because “they enjoy where they work” and 26 percent “fear retirement may be boring.”

Construction jobs in Rhode Island grow

Saturday, February 21st, 2015

Construction jobs in Rhode Island and other areas continue to show strong growth, according to an ADP report.

The ADP Workforce Vitality Index, which measures the total wages paid to the U.S. private sector workforce, was 106.7 in the fourth quarter of 2014.

Workforce vitality varies across industries. The strongest growth over the past year has been in Construction, 8.4%, thanks to a combination of strong employment growth, wage growth and an increase in hours worked.  Manufacturing WVI advanced by 6.3% due to growth in wages and employment in large companies with more than 1,000 workers.

The WVI in Leisure & Hospitality and Trade advanced just over 6%, due to solid gains in both wages and employment.  Financial service workers enjoyed strong wage growth of 5.9%, but experienced weak employment growth.

The weakest index growth has been in Professional/Business Services and the Education/Healthcare sector, mostly due to weak wage growth.

The WVI is growing most quickly for younger workers, those under 25 years of age.  During the past four quarters it grew by 8.6%.  The annual turnover rate for workers under 25 was 49% in 2014 compared to an average of 23% nationwide, indicating more opportunities in the labor market for this age group.

Wages for those in the under-25 group grew more than twice as fast as the wages of any other group.  On the other end of the spectrum, the 55+ segment was second in terms of WVI growth.

The index for these workers increased by 6.5%.  Wages increased by 2.3%, which was slightly lower than the wage growth of the two middle tiers. Workers 55+ showed stronger employment growth than the other age groups.

This may have been driven by a combination of workers crossing the 55 age threshold and older workers delaying retirement.